Cows in Trees by Julian Earl


As pet owners, a trip to the vets is all part and parcel of owning a pet.

Fri 02 Dec 2016

By Judy

Cows in Trees by Julian Earl

Cows in Trees by Julian Earl

As pet owners, a trip to the vets is all part and parcel of owning a pet. But have you ever wondered what is it actually like to work as a vet?

Working as a vet is often seen as a glamourous occupation, but the reality is mess, noise, dealing with the public, being called out on an emergency calls in the middle of the night and long hours. Plus there is the constant threat of injuries and accidents from large unruly animals. You certainly need a sense of humour to be a vet, and the author of Cows in Trees, vet Julian Earl certainly has that essential attribute.

Vet Julian is a true animal lover, although he rather honestly admits that he has not liked every single pet that he has treated.  As we well know, our pets do seem to take on another personality when visiting the vet, often not so nice or indeed placid, and we expect vets to deal with it.

The book is written in a warm and light hearted style, and yes, the cow in the tree story as depicted on the front cover of this hardback book really did happen!

Cows in Trees is beautifully written, capturing many hilarious moments of Julian’s career throughout, and a few very sad ones as well. The book is broken down into 18 chapters, and spans 152 pages. This hardback book will appeal to pet owners and non-pet owners alike, and is certainly one of our favourite books of 2016 so far.

About the author Julian Earl

Julian Earl dreamed of working as a vet from his childhood, and finally achieved his ambition by qualifying as a veterinary surgeon at Liverpool university in 1981. He has worked in Lancashire and Lincolnshire working with both domestic pets and farm livestock. During his long career, Julian was also the president Lincolnshire Veterinary Association and the Sheep Veterinary Society.

Sadly, Julian suffered life-threatening injuries during a cyle race in 2012 that brought his clinical work to an end. However, he is now an approved para-cyclist and plans to return once again to competition.