How to Find a Good Dog Breeder


Every dog lover wants to know they are buying a new puppy from a reputable and caring breeder and not a puppy farm, but how can you ensure you are buying a puppy that has been bred with their welfare and good health in mind?

Wed 21 Dec 2016

By Judy

How to Find a Good Dog Breeder

Every dog lover wants to know they are buying a new puppy from a reputable and caring breeder and not a puppy farm, but how can you ensure you are buying a puppy that has been bred with their welfare and good health in mind?


Sadly, irresponsible breeders and puppy farms are still very much in existence. The rise of sales of puppies on the internet, often by unscrupulous breeders coupled with the risk of scams, where advertised puppies do not even exist are also common. So how do you ensure you are buying a puppy from a reliable source?

Buy from a Kennel Club assured breeder

The Kennel Club produces a nationwide list of assured breeders by individual breed, and this is a good starting point in finding your new puppy. Be aware, not every good breeder is an assured breeder, and the Kennel Club does not cover breeders of the increasing popular designer or mixed breeds such as Cockerpoos or Labradoodles or indeed mongrels.

Consult your veterinary practice

Vets and veterinary nurses often have good relationships with dog breeders, and can normally point you in the right direction when searching for your new pet. Responsible breeders will pay frequent visits to their vet for health checks and to vaccinate their litters. This is often convenient to prospective dog owners who don’t want to travel long distances to find a new puppy.

Word of mouth around the dog world

There are many experts in the dog community involved in agility, dog showing that may know reputable breeders. Pet professionals such as dog trainers, groomers, micro chippers and behaviourists often have links to caring and knowledgeable breeders. Litters of puppies from family or trusted friends is often another good source for finding a healthy puppy.

Breed specific clubs

There are literally hundreds of dog clubs and associations covering virtually all the different breeds by region on the internet. Members of these groups can provide you with invaluable advice and information about your desired breed, with many members involved in breeding healthily and ethically. These clubs can be a great support network to owners of a new unfamiliar breed or uncommon breed.

Welfare and rescue centres

Your local welfare and rescue centre is a good source of finding a new dog, especially if you are looking for a slightly older dog. However, you may not ever know the background of the dog, but staff will have a clear insight into its temperament and any bad habits or health issues that may be present.

Beware of puppy fraudsters on the internet

Although not every puppy advertised on the internet or small ad in your local shop or paper is a scam or bred irresponsibility, the risks of buying an unhealthy puppy or losing several hundred pounds is certainly higher from this source. Fraudsters are becoming ever more sophisticated and plausible with certain breeds commanding hundreds of pounds.

Why is it important to find a reputable breeder?

Remember, a dog that has been bred purely for financial gain may have underlying health issues that may not be evident in puppy hood, such as hip dysplasia, which can result in pain and distress to your dog, and cost you hundreds of pounds in veterinary fees and treatment. So, it’s certainly worth taking extra time researching breeders and litters to find a healthy and contented puppy.